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Category Archives: Perception and Consciousness

The Controlling Frequency of Fear

The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.

The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.

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(This post is a rework and repost of a blog of the same title from October 2008)

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Energy is a vibration, and the Universe has an unlimited supply.

One of the fundamental laws of physics is the conservation of energy: energy is neither created or destroyed. It does change forms all of the time, however.

Energy is something that each and every one of us has, and our bodies carry out some of the most complex changes of energy observable anywhere in the world.   While we may consciously observe some of these changes – as in digestion, respiration and exercise – most are relatively unaware of the vibrations and complex changes that thoughts and beliefs make.  The vibrations of our thoughts ripple through the universe  in all directions, like a stone tossed in the middle of a lake,  and the magnetism of our beliefs draws upon the unlimited reserves of energy that the Universe has at its disposal.    This is the process of creation, and every one of us is here to learn the lesson of responsible co-creation.

Our thoughts and beliefs can generate and attract certain frequencies, some of which are beneficial for our body and state of mind, while others are damaging, limiting, restricting and poisonous.   Thoughts and beliefs are energy.   Our bodies are an extension of thought and maintain a vibration all their own,  and yet  are in constant relation to the whole universe.  Like a single instrument in an orchestra,  our thoughts and actions are small movements within a larger body of vibrations.

In an ideal state of optimum health, the body’s overall frequency (understood as a personal energy or vibration) is clear and more “in tune” or in harmony with the Universe of energy, or Spirit.  This resonant harmony operates like a magnetic field, and until something comes along to disrupt that magnetic field, the frequency remains clear and unwavering.   In this state, one experiences health, vitality, energy, happiness, and openness.

On the contrary, a chaotic or diseased mind is one that is not in harmony with the Universe, and the body is suffering from a dissonance. Like a sour note stands out in a choir singing in perfect harmony, the mind that is not in tune with the Universe suffers the clashing vibration. This vibration, like an energy field surrounding the body, resonates through every cell, which begin to vibrate at that frequency as well.   The higher, clear frequency is overcome by the lumbering waves of discord – the cells vibrating with negative belief.  Over time, this can lead to physical ailments, mental disorders, mood swings and disease.

The only way that human beings direct energy is through thought, and through the underlying beliefs and belief-structures formed from those thoughts.   Thoughts occur in our minds, not as apparitions that appear from nowhere and disappear again the next moment in to the ether, but as real, rock-solid choices.   Thoughts are chosen – accepted as true or untrue by our minds.

The thoughts we accept lead to larger structures of thought called belief.  These larger structures of belief are more rigid representations of the original thought and, in turn, give rise to future thoughts, which most often seek to validate the belief and the original thought.  In this way, our thoughts reveal a lot about the mental structures we have created in our mind.  Every thought that we do not challenge becomes an accepted belief.  These may clash with other thoughts we have, or they may compliment and enhance them.

Thought directs emotion, not the other way around; and emotion, like thought, is a vibration.

Each emotion has its own corresponding frequency, which is beyond the scope of this article.   For now, let us consider the frequency of love vs. the frequency of fear.  I choose these because they are mutually exclusive.   Imagine thoughts of love as a single, high-pitched and unwaveringly clear sound.  This is the sound of creation – Being Itself.   Our thoughts of love, acceptance, openness, empathy, unity, forgiveness – all harmonic variations of the one clear sound of Life – keep our body and our mind “in tune” with the universe.

On the other hand, emotions such as fear are like deep, long, lumbering and wavering sounds, which clash with dissonance with every falter.  These vibrations do not meld with the vibration of Life.  This dissonance causes disruptions at many levels and the body and mind suffer the consequences.    A mind in this state may think this dissonance is desirable or unavoidable and create belief structures based upon this thought.  In this way, the mind conditions itself to vibrate with the dissonance and reinforces the “reality” of chaos and fear.

Expectations are formed from reinforced thoughts and beliefs. Our thoughts have a “magnetic propensity” to attract events, persons and situations that fit with those thoughts. Thoughts of fear and death always attract fearful experiences to validate the thoughts that called for them. That is the nature of creation – a fundamental precept that most of us have been taught to ignore or be fearful of. The vibration of fear is both instinctual for the preservation of one’s life and a source of limitation. It has been used against us to enslave our minds.  This is because fear represents uncertainty and discord.

Our thoughts create our perception and experience.

I take certain biblical passages to mean just that: “Ask and you shall receive.” and “As you sow, so shall you reap.” and “Ye shall know them by their fruits.”

Our thoughts direct energy to create a frequency and that frequency, like a magnet, attracts universal frequencies that resonate with that frequency. Thoughts always seek to be self-validating. Watch your mind to see how this works. “I’m sick of x” or “I’m tired of y” can eventually manifest in sickness and fatigue. It is what you are telling your body to react to – frequencies to seek out and resonate with -what your mind wants.  It is the reality your mind seeks.

As my father told me, “Your mind is attracted to what you think, and what you expect to see you draw out of the universe.” He told me of an instance when he wanted to put a walkway in his yard and thought that distressed bricks would be a good material to use. As he was driving with my sister along a stretch of road they have driven down a thousand times before, they started talking about the walkway and where they might find distressed bricks.

He went on to explain that, along that drive, she and he were suddenly inundated by all sorts of distressed bricks that appeared in certain spots next to the road. “THAT would be a perfect brick to use,” each exclaimed as another one “stuck out” in their perceptions. The bricks were there all of the time, no doubt, but it wasn’t until they were thinking about a need for those bricks that their minds were open to the perception of those bricks.   At the level of their experience, the bricks were not there until they were called forth from the universe.  This is the true of all thoughts we choose and the experiences we have.

Our thoughts create our perception and experience. We have been taught to be distrustful of the mind, however, and of our thoughts. This has been by design and has been perpetuated through society by the elite of this world who understand the power of thought and the nature of the mind. In fact, most of us have been through a long period of mind-programming since we were born to separate our mind from itself so that it does not know or experience this truth.

We are taught what to think, how to think, what to do, who to go with, what to expect, what not to expect, what to dream for, what to avoid, how to be “good” Christians or patriots or children, how to be law-abiding citizens, and not to be critical of things going on in the world. In effect, our own creative abilities have been short-circuited by society, religion, schools, media, government, parents – you name it.   Yet when we realize that our thoughts go out like feelers to pull out of the universe what we expect, then we are suddenly empowered and our thoughts are seen as alive.   We then realize that our fears were mistaken and mis-given.  They serve to short-circuit experience, creativity and thought.

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Part Two

Fear is increasing in the world.  The preceding statement is both a thought I have and a thought that mankind shares.   Much of the fear in the world lives under the shadow of deceit, ignorance and guilt.  There are a lot of things to be fearful of: cancer, the economy, war, terrorism – you name it. All of these are being manipulated, controlled and amplified to produce a global, mass reaction and a global frequency of fear. Our pastors, our teachers, our politicians, the talking heads of corporate media, and Hollywood all teach us to be fearful and reinforce the global frequency of fear, which effectively locks the planet up like a prison.

The frequency of fear keeps us fixated upon the most basic, fundamental levels of survival and unable to understand deeper areas of ourselves, our psyches and the influences of this world, as well as our own creative source and the inextinguishable part of ourselves that exists quite apart from the perceptions we choose.

Politics and world news are full of things to be fearful of, and those things that cause the most fear generate the reaction those in power want. According to the Hegelian dialectic of problem-reaction-solution, they manipulate events to create a problem, which generates fear and a need from the public for a solution. So they step forward with the solution they had in mind from the beginning and the fearful masses are willing to accept the solution to get rid of the fear.  This happens everyday in our society, and more and more, our society is becoming closed.

In my opinion, September 11th, 2001 is one such psychological attack on the minds of the world. Look at the media coverage, the references to the event from politicians, the ensuing Global War on Terror, the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the curtailing of liberties … all of this – problem-reaction-solution – and a huge stage for a performance of shock and awe, fear and death. And all of this amplified by the little box nearly every American has in their living room.

It has been proven that television is a great mind-control mechanism. While the person is watching in a trance, they are actually using less energy than when sitting doing nothing at all. Likewise, their brainwaves are slowed down to the level of hypnotic suggestion, combined with the flashing lights and images to keep you “tuned in.” That is why Time Warner Cable’s logo is the hypnotic eye.  You are being manipulated – your thoughts and beliefs hijacked – for the sake of control and capitalism.

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Brainwashing Made Easy

Brainwashing Made Easy

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No one wants to feel fear, yet it is there to keep each of us safe from danger. The elite, however, have learned to manipulate that to their advantage. With global media corporations in place, controlled and operated BY the elite, they can amplify that fear quite easily. Turn on the news, open a newspaper and you’ll see exactly what I mean. Fear sells! Think of how much fear has done to our country over the past several decades, beginning with the Federal Reserve’s engineered depression in the 1930’s. Then Pearl Harbor, then the Korean War, then the Vietnam War and the Cold War, then the war on drugs, OKC bombing, September 11th and global terrorism. It’s a big business, controlling your mind.

If you are caught in a frequency of fear, you can be easily led towards whatever solution is offered up to end that fear. Your innate power as Spirit is turned into an instrument of power for them, as you give away your power to feel safe – with their protection. In fact, they’ve got all sorts of solutions:

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Afraid of crime? Hire more police and build more prisons.

Afraid of unemployment? Work harder.

Afraid of AIDS? Don’t have sex.

Afraid of immigrants? Keep them out.

Afraid of foreigners? Bomb the hell out of them.

Afraid of terrorism? Restrict civil liberties.

Afraid of chaos? Support the status quo.

Afraid of failure? Don’t take chances.

Afraid of being alone? Conform.

Afraid of going to hell? Obey the Church.
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Obey. That is the name of the game of control. And controlled you are if you do not recognize how innately powerful, creative and safe you really are. This life is not all you are, but it is everything you’ve been taught to believe. Who taught you? What is the source of this “knowledge”?  Under all of our thoughts and beliefs is the Source of thinking itself.

Ultimately, all fear is fear of death – and death is the ultimate form of control. Images of death abound in today’s society, glorified by Hollywood and taken to extreme and grotesque levels, saturating our news and intruding upon our lives through measures of control to prevent our untimely death. Think about it.

The Politics of Fear utilized by the White House and certain members of Congress is an attempt to control you, plain and simple. Real and engineered events will occur to validate that fear and keep its frequency strong. Buildings collapse, bombs explode and “terrorists” are being watched for everywhere you go. In fact, you may be held in suspect. You should be fearful of your neighbors, too – they might be the next militant jihadist. Terrorism, political and economic, is the name of the game for the elite right now, as they can use it to instill fear, get the masses to conform, and exercise an increasing amount of control, coercion and restrictions upon freedom.

Fear is maintained through lies and deceit and I’ve had all I can take, especially from our government. There are few among us who do not believe that politicians are liars, yet we believe them when fear is involved. That is why, on the path for the search for Truth, we must, of necessity, come face to face with our thoughts, beliefs and fears. Before we can resonate with the Truth, all of the dissonant beliefs must be seen for what they are in the light of day and discarded. The illusions must be exchanged for the truth.  Our fears must be dispelled before we see how ultimately safe we are.

That is the process of waking up.

Are you “awake”?

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Have scientists located religion’s “G-spot”?

Scientists believe they have found the "God spot" in the human brain.  They say religion is an adaptive part of our evolution.

Scientists believe they have found the "God spot" in the human brain, the part that "controls" religious experience. They say religion is an adaptive part of our evolution.

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“When we have incomplete knowledge of the world around us, it offers us the opportunities to believe in God. When we don’t have a scientific explanation for something, we tend to rely on supernatural explanations,” said Professor Grafman, who believes in God. “Maybe obeying supernatural forces that we had no knowledge of made it easier for religious forms of belief to emerge.”

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Some scientists believe they have pinpointed the brain’s “G-spots” – the pleasure centers relating  to religious experience and those that “control religious faith”.   They argue that these biological foundations for religious tendencies in humans are a product of human evolution – a necessary part of our survival.

The researchers said their findings support the idea that the brain has evolved to be sensitive to any form of belief that improves the chances of survival, which could explain why a belief in God and the supernatural became so widespread in human evolutionary history.

The article below highlights the results of a study published in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.   According to this study volunteers were asked to think about religious and moral issues, while scientists observed areas of the brain for neural activity associated with those thoughts.  What they discovered is that religious and moral beliefs activate the same areas of the brain.   These areas include portions of the frontal lobe (which is unique to humans among animals), as well as the temporal and parietal lobes.

No one knows exactly why these areas of the brain show increased activity with regard to religious and ethical issues, nor the reason why these same areas are active during moments of intense religious experience and perceived absorption into the Divine.  One scientist, Professor Grafman, points out:

“There is nothing unique about religious belief in these brain structures. Religion doesn’t have a ‘God spot’ as such, instead it’s embedded in a whole range of other belief systems in the brain that we use everyday”.

Indeed, our moral and ethical beliefs influence a wide-range of other core, fundamental beliefs that we hold, and consideration of the effects (both in this world and the next) of choices and actions undoubtedly has an affect, to some degree or another, on many interrelated belief systems.  This may explain why several areas of the brain are active upon such considerations and not just one.

Yet, if religious thinking is “embedded in a whole range of other belief systems” it would seem that there is some underlying cause or reason for that.   The first quote above suggests that the reason for this is that of ignorance seeking understanding, a  search for a scientific or even “supernatural” explanation for things we experience but can make no rational sense of.   This appears to be false on the face of it.

Often, science offers up a rational, methodical, observable answer for a phenomena, but those of religious inclinations may disregard the findings of science altogether.  For example, science posits the notion of evolution, which is, in part, based upon observable data.  Yet there is a large body of theologians who discount such theories because their religion tells them differently.  For them, it is a “matter of faith” that God created the world and the universe.   If religious inclinations are based upon biological processes attempting to make sense of and order the world rationally, then it begs the question, “Why do religious people, in the face of compelling, rational, observable, scientific data, reject those theories for something abstract, unobservable and non-empirical?”

I believe the reason for this lies in the nature of the religious experience – an important issue that the article below does not address.  One of the best texts regarding religious experiences is William James’, The Varieties of Religious Experience: A Study in Human Nature.   Mr. James took an empirical look at the many types of religious experiences, observed the similarities among them, then showed the four characteristics these experiences share:

1.  Ineffability

2.  Noetic quality

3.  Transience

4.  Passivity

According to James, all truly religious experience are ineffable: they cannot or should not be put into written words.  This is because the experience is one of “other-worldliness” or “greater reality”, such that normal words and concepts cannot accurately portray what the experience was.   Religious experiences also contain a noetic quality, which means they impart some sort of wisdom or knowledge to the individual.  Although the experience itself is beyond words, the person believes they have gained some insight into themselves, the world, or society as a whole.  This knowledge is not empirical, but subjective.  Such experiences are also short-lived, but, nevertheless, so profound that the individual seeks to recapture the experience again and again.  In so doing, James adds that most realize the passivity of the experience – one cannot make it happen whenever desired.   The individual has no control over the experience.   It cannot be recreated in a lab, to be studied, monitored and recorded.

All this study below shows is that certain parts of the brain are active at certain times under certain conditions.  This does not point to a “God spot” or any such area of the brain, which is responsible for – that is, causative of – human beings’ inclination towards the Divine.   Since 95% of the world believes in one form of God or another, we are still left with the begging question, “Why?”  If this is merely a result of evolution or neural activity, why is the “God impulse” so widespread?  It strains reason to think that such beliefs are simply a result of physical processes in the brain – that religion and morality is simply a bi-product of thought – or that such profound, life-changing experiences are merely physical, chemical actions of our brain.

Furthermore, if religion is an adaptive belief system designed for survival, why does religious history abound with stories of individuals who died or were martyred because of their faith?

While I love science, sometimes scientists are a little short-sighted and have a hard time accepting data that cannot be empirically measured, quantified, recorded and cataloged.   The scientific method itself demands such qualities of a verifiable experience, which precludes non-empirical data such as that purported by spiritual people.   With respect to the Being of God and that of religious experiences, scientists almost always miss the mark in attempting to prove or disprove the existence of God according to such empirical methods.  Even scientists who believe in God and who seek to use science to find a physical connection between humans and God always fail to provide the proof they seek to show.

Proof for the existence or nonexistence of God is impossible and misses the point.

For the religious follower, one should seek the experience of God first, then all proofs are meaningless because the mind then knows God.   They argue that God can only be known directly, not through concepts and theorems, but through an open heart and mind.

I believe that the reason for this is that Spirit comes first, then the mind, … then the physical – of which the brain is part.  The physical world and perceptual sensation is an end-result of Spirit and Mind.  Perception is a product, not a source.

As such, pointing to the result/product itself (the physical world and perception) for substantiation of the cause (Spirit and Mind)  or in hope to understand the processes that gave rise to the result, is based upon error.    Utilizing a purely empirical scientific method to study the physical brain, thinking this will give us insight into the mind and Spirit, will not tell us anything beyond the constraints of physically perceivable phenomena and the range of “acceptable” answers we allow.  We have already framed the answer and results with our expectations, which themselves arise from the beliefs we hold.   Quantum physicists call this the “observer effect.”

Scientists do the same when they study physical phenomena to try to gain insight into the spiritual.   Their results are framed by the fundamental beliefs they hold.  These beliefs give rise to the accepted means of measurement, which further frames the results.

The limits of the scientific method are built in to frame the results in terms of what is accepted FIRST to be true.    For empirical scientists and atheists, the fundamental reality is the physical world of sense experience and perception, and it is taken as truth that studying physical phenomena can give greater understanding of our reality.  Religious believers, on the other hand, may believe that the spiritual world is ultimate reality, while the physical world is illusion.  This leads to entirely different schools of thought, which have been attempting to reconcile their opposing views for ages.

Theologians and scientists are still grappling with that conundrum, attempting to look to the brain for insight into the Spirit.  They will exhaust themselves, for they will find only what they expect to find, again and again, framed by the questions they ask and the expectations they have.   If they’re searching for the physical processes that “give rise to” religious belief, they’ll find the processes which appear to do so.  If they search for the source of physical processes to begin with, then an entirely different answer emerges.

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Belief and the brain’s ‘God spot’

Scientists say they have located the parts of the brain that control religious faith. And the research proves, they contend, that belief in a higher power is an evolutionary asset that helps human survival. Steve Connor reports

Tuesday, 10 March 2009

A belief in God is deeply embedded in the human brain, which is programmed for religious experiences, according to a study that analyses why religion is a universal human feature that has encompassed all cultures throughout history.

Scientists searching for the neural “God spot”, which is supposed to control religious belief, believe that there is not just one but several areas of the brain that form the biological foundations of religious belief.

The researchers said their findings support the idea that the brain has evolved to be sensitive to any form of belief that improves the chances of survival, which could explain why a belief in God and the supernatural became so widespread in human evolutionary history.

“Religious belief and behaviour are a hallmark of human life, with no accepted animal equivalent, and found in all cultures,” said Professor Jordan Grafman, from the US National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in Bethesda, near Washington. “Our results are unique in demonstrating that specific components of religious belief are mediated by well-known brain networks, and they support contemporary psychological theories that ground religious belief within evolutionary-adaptive cognitive functions.”

Scientists are divided on whether religious belief has a biological basis. Some evolutionary theorists have suggested that Darwinian natural selection may have put a premium on individuals if they were able to use religious belief to survive hardships that may have overwhelmed those with no religious convictions. Others have suggested that religious belief is a side effect of a wider trait in the human brain to search for coherent beliefs about the outside world. Religion and the belief in God, they argue, are just a manifestation of this intrinsic, biological phenomenon that makes the human brain so intelligent and adaptable.

The latest study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, involved analysing the brains of volunteers, who had been asked to think about religious and moral problems and questions. For the analysis, the researchers used a functional magnetic-resonance imaging machine, which can identify the most energetically-active regions of the brain.

They found that people of different religious persuasions and beliefs, as well as atheists, all tended to use the same electrical circuits in the brain to solve a perceived moral conundrum – and the same circuits were used when religiously-inclined people dealt with issues related to God.

The study found that several areas of the brain are involved in religious belief, one within the frontal lobes of the cortex – which are unique to humans – and another in the more evolutionary-ancient regions deeper inside the brain, which humans share with apes and other primates, Professor Grafman said.

“There is nothing unique about religious belief in these brain structures. Religion doesn’t have a ‘God spot’ as such, instead it’s embedded in a whole range of other belief systems in the brain that we use everyday,” Professor Grafman said.

The search for the God spot has in the past led scientists to many different regions of the brain. An early contender was the brain’s temporal lobe, a large section of the brain that sits over each ear, because temporal-lobe epileptics suffering seizures in these regions frequently report having intense religious experiences. One of the principal exponents of this idea was Vilayanur Ramachandran, from the University of California, San Diego, who asked several of his patients with temporal-lobe epilepsy to listen to a mixture of religious, sexual and neutral words while measuring their levels of arousal and emotional reactions. Religious words elicited an unusually high response in these patients.

This work was followed by a study where scientists tried to stimulate the temporal lobes with a rotating magnetic field produced by a “God helmet”. Michael Persinger, from Laurentian University in Ontario, found that he could artificially create the experience of religious feelings – the helmet’s wearer reports being in the presence of a spirit or having a profound feeling of cosmic bliss.

Dr Persinger said that about eight in every 10 volunteers report quasi-religious feelings when wearing his helmet. However, when Professor Richard Dawkins, an evolutionist and renowned atheist, wore it during the making of a BBC documentary, he famously failed to find God, saying that the helmet only affected his breathing and his limbs.

Other studies of people taking part in Buddhist meditation suggested the parietal lobes at the upper back region of the brain were involved in controlling religious belief, in particular the mystical elements that gave people a feeling of being on a higher plane during prayer.

Andrew Newberg, from the University of Pennsylvania, injected radioactive isotope into Buddhists at the point at which they achieved meditative nirvana. Using a special camera, he captured the distribution of the tracer in the brain, which led the researchers to identify the parietal lobes as playing a key role during this transcendental state.

Professor Grafman was more interested in how people coped with everyday moral and religious questions. He said that the latest study, published today, suggests the brain is inherently sensitive to believing in almost anything if there are grounds for doing so, but when there is a mystery about something, the same neural machinery is co-opted in the formulation of religious belief.

“When we have incomplete knowledge of the world around us, it offers us the opportunities to believe in God. When we don’t have a scientific explanation for something, we tend to rely on supernatural explanations,” said Professor Grafman, who believes in God. “Maybe obeying supernatural forces that we had no knowledge of made it easier for religious forms of belief to emerge.”

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/belief-and-the-brains–god-spot-1641022.html

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To Coin a New Term: Thought-Charade

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During the course of my brainstorming for a book I am working on, I had a phrase come to mind that seems to sum up a lot of what I see occuring in the world. I looked it up on Google and wasn’t successful finding any pre-existence of the word, so I’ll be happy to coin the word myself:

Thought-charade: 1. noun, empty or deceptive thoughts (The consciousness of humanity suffers from continual, compounded thought-charades.); 2. noun, plural, the game of defending known empty or deceptive thoughts to make them seem plausible, real, accepted by others (I switched on the television to find the talking heads playing thought-charades, attempting to make the case that the country is not in a recession.); 3. noun, the process of supporting empty or deceptive thoughts (George W. Bush’s thought-charade seemed to fool the attendees of the reception, but Alice and I knew his assertions were baseless.)

One of my arguments regarding perception is that it is always limited and provides only a very small window into reality. For example, the sense of smell in bloodhounds is far more developed than in humans. As humans, our perception of the “universe of odors” is only a small portion of reality, in terms of available sense data, yet we act and respond to our limited perception of sound as if it is all that is real. We take for granted that perception seeks to limit and define reality based upon selective data.

To take this idea further, humans build huge structures of belief based upon thoughts they form through the auspices of the physical senses. For example, the entire discipline of science, in general, is one such set of belief structures, which orders thoughts and experience (perception) based upon empirical data. The scientific method has been a long-standing measure of reality and functions in each and every one of our lives through our belief in its ability to provide an accurate understanding of observable phenomena (perception). Usually, if a thing cannot be observed or perceived in one way or another, then it is not known to be real.

We are beings who construct a picture of “reality” through the medium of perception, and yet on the other hand, we form beliefs about reality based upon the perceptions we experience. This is the definition of providing a circular definition.

When my daughter was small, she used to play make-believe a lot. She would play with her dolls and her doll house in very realistic ways. Understanding psychology, I recognized that she projected her own beliefs and experiences onto the imagined experiences of her dolls and she played out many of the same scenarios she had learned (through perception) through her dolls. She constructed a picture of reality for those dolls, generated through her own experiences and beliefs. While she asserted this reality in play, she was also asserting a lot more. She was reinforcing her perceptions as reality.

If we take for granted that our perception gives us access to reality, then this process seems self-fulfilling and is, no doubt, true unto itself. If we question whether or not perception gives us access to reality, however, then basing beliefs and claims to reality upon perception is just plain silly – especially when accompanied by the fervency with which so many people hold beliefs.

Think about it – people live by, die by, kill by and love according to beliefs they hold. If our thoughts are based upon only a small sliver of reality, how can we believe so blindly in what may be our own private illusions? How can we know that what we perceive is true, without pointing to perception itself?

This brings me to the point of the word: thought-charade. While many have asserted through the ages that life is a dream or an illusion (as in Hinduism, maya), the term thought-charade seems more appropriate. An illusion or dream suggests passivity on the part of the person who suffers them. Like a motion picture, the images appear as one merely sits by and observes. In my view, however, thoughts shape and mold “reality” and form experience. This is hardly a passive process!

Although, as a species, we are not very evolved in controlling our thoughts and directing belief in a conscious way, our thoughts and beliefs constantly and continually create our individual realities. We may not recognize the seemingly magical process by which our beliefs pull out of the universe that which we believe; nevertheless, it is still a process of consciousness that occurs all of the time, in every one of our lives by our active imagination and participation, whether we recognize it or not.

These thoughts and beliefs are chosen repeatedly through our lives. These choices generate experience. In turn, we form beliefs based upon these perceptions. Furthermore, beliefs shape perception so that experiences, viewed through the filter of belief, tend to validate the beliefs we hold. The person who goes around proclaiming, “People are assholes!” will, no doubt, find innumerable experiences that justify this position, thereby solidifying the person’s perception and “reality.” In this circularly-defined construction of “reality”, we find ourselves utterly lost and cut off from the Source – Ultimate Reality, asserting that all we are and All That Is is the world served upon the platter of perception. How wrong we have been.

In this way, each of our lives is a thought-charade. Until human beings recognize the importance of thoughts and beliefs in determining experience, they will continue to search for reality in perception – in experience itself, which is a product of thoughts and beliefs that are assertions of reality. Your reality is not found in sense experience. Take comfort in that because the picture of yourself which your physical senses tell you IS you, is not and never will be the fullness of what YOU are.

Reality exists and can be recalled when the thought-charade is seen for what it is, and the game is no longer played.

Collectively, the human race still has a long way to go to this realization. The game is “real”, it is the only game being played. And we’ve got a whole bunch of people with a whole lot of money being spent on manipulating your perceptions into believing their thought-charade.

They’re exceedingly good at it. If you do not recognize this fact, then I’m sorry to say, you’re living a thought-charade.

It’s a good thing there is one reality of our existence that we cannot change, which will bring an end to the thought-charade eventually … I only hope that each of us doesn’t choose to wait until then to begin the process of unraveling our tangled perception of reality.

 

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The Inner Landscape of Thoughts

Outer Reality is a reflection of the Inner Reality

Outer Reality is a reflection of the Inner Reality

Your body is a representation of your thoughts, beliefs and expectations, just as the world is a representation of the thoughts, beliefs and expectations of the collective consciousness of the world.

Your thoughts are alive and seek expression. Choose them carefully. Your body responds to your mental direction, whether chosen consciously by you or not.

Thoughts of anger, depression and attack can express themselves internally in the form of sickness, fatigue and disease. Your body responds to the internal mental environment you create.

Likewise, thoughts of joy, cooperation and love also express themselves, but do so far easier because of the natural creative aspect of the mind is one of unity and extension not isolation and destruction. Their fruits are happiness, harmony and health.

Creative expression is the source of all things and the mind is the activating agent of Spirit for such expression. As humans, we are learning how to direct that creativity.

Those that dwell on thoughts of anger and attack create to destroy, which goes against the natural order of the universe. For those, life can be difficult indeed, and every obstacle arises to fit with the expected perception.

Release yourself from your creations if they have not served you well. Your thoughts are under your direction. Your perception is largely a matter of choice.

 

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